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  • Course Description

    INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY STUDIES SEMINAR

    WINTER SEMESTER 2021

    Daniela Theinová, PhD
    Tuesday 17:30-19:05, Room 104
    Wednesday  15:50-17:25, Room 1 / 17:30-19:05, Room 1

    Consultation hours: Thursday 10:00-10:45, Room 219b

    Email: daniela.theinova@ff.cuni.cz

    NB: Scroll below to access reading materials and questions/assignments for each upcoming class.

    Link to the Moodle site of prof. Pilny's Introduction to Literary Studies lecture: https://dl1.cuni.cz/course/view.php?id=12354

    OBJECTIVES
    The general aim of the seminar is to improve students’ reading and interpreting skills. Students are provided with an opportunity to test out in practice some of the knowledge gained in the lecture and to discuss the critical terms with which they were acquainted. The seminar also includes several sessions focused on the use of some basic terms of poetics in an analysis of specific poems. Formal properties of the academic essay are applied in the students’ final written projects.

    MATERIAL
    Recommended Reading:

    Aristotle, Poetics.
    Bredin, Hugh. "Comparisons and Similes". Lingua 105 (1998), 67-78.
    Cuddon, A.J., The Penguin Dictionary of Literary Terms and Literary Theory (London: Penguin, 1992).
    Donoghue, Denis. Metaphor (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2014).
    Fludernik, M., An Introduction to Narratology (Abingdon: Routledge, 2009).
    Green, K. and LeBihan, J., Critical Theory and Practice (London: Routledge, 1996).
    Herman, D., ed., The Cambridge Companion to Narrative (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007).
    Hobsbaum, P., Metre, Rhythm and Verse Form (Abingdon: Routledge, 1996).
    Montgomery, M., et al., Ways of Reading (London: Routledge, 1992).
    Pavis, P., Dictionary of the Theatre: Terms, Concepts, and Analysis (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1998).
    Preminger, A. and Brogan, T.V.F., The New Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1993).

    SYLLABUS – WINTER SEMESTER 2021/22

    WEEK 1 (5 and 6 and Oct)
    Introduction, Course Outline and Requirements
    Introduction to research

    WEEK 2 (12 and 13 and Oct)
    Figurative Language 1: Metaphor, Metonymy, Synecdoche
    Definitions of the tropes, examples and discussion: Shakespeare, Shelley

    WEEK 3 (19 and 20 Oct)
    Figurative Language 2: Metaphor, Metonymy, Synecdoche
    Examples and discussion: Donne, Moore, Heaney

    WEEK 4 (26 and 27 Oct)
    Figurative Language 3: Irony
    Definitions, various types and uses of the trope
    Examples and discussion: Shakespeare, Swift, A. Burns

    WEEK 5 (2 and 3 Nov)
    NO CLASS – Written assignment (deadline and topic tba)

    WEEK 6 (9 and 10 Nov)
    Poetic Form 1: Sound Patterning: Metre and Rhythm
    Metrical form. Scansion
    Examples and discussion: Donne, Blake, Dickinson, Owen, Marvell

    WEEK 7 (16 and 17 and Nov)
    NO CLASS – Written assignment (deadline and topic tba)
    Poetic Form 2: Sound Patterning and Rhyme
    Purpose and effects of sound patterning and rhyme
    Examples and discussion: Keats, Hopkins, Muldoon

    WEEK 8 (23 and 24 Nov)
    Verse Forms
    Overview of verse forms
    Examples and discussion: Bishop, Keats, D. Thomas

    WEEK 9 (30 Nov and 1 Dec)
    Drama and Theatre 1
    History of staging conventions, tragedy and comedy
    Discussion of J. M. Synge’s Riders to the Sea

    WEEK 10 (7 and 8 Dec)
    Drama and Theatre II
    Modern drama and theatre
    Discussion of Samuel Beckett’s Krapp’s Last Tape

    NB: ESSAYS must be uploaded on the course site by 23.59 on 8 December 2021. Essays must be typed (as a WORD DOC not a PDF) and uploaded on the course Moodle site. For further instructions see below.

    WEEK 11 (14 and 15 Dec)
    Genre I
    Criteria of classification; function and use of genre.
    Discussion of Angela Carter’s “In the Company of Wolves”

    WEEK 12 (21 and 22 Jan)
    Intertextuality, Allusion
    Definitions of terms
    Examples and Discussion: T. S. Eliot, P. Muldoon (selected extracts)
    CONCLUSIONS: Course evaluations, essays evaluations, information on test

    WEEK 13 (4 and 5 Jan)
    Reserve

    COURSE REQUIREMENTS

    ATTENDANCE
    Students are expected to attend classes. YOU ARE PERMITTED A MAXIMUM OF TWO ABSENCES.

    PARTICIPATION
    Participation extends beyond mere attendance. Expect your instructor to keep track of how often you contribute, particularly during the class discussions of assigned readings and/or minor written assignments.

    MID-TERM ESSAY

    (see the PDF below for Essay Guidelines)

    Select one of the following texts:
    Seamus Heaney, “Punishment”
    Derek Walcott, “Becune Point”
    Elizabeth Bishop, “Seascape”
    Maya Angelou, “Still I Rise”

    AND address one of the following topics in relation to the text you have chosen:
    1. Isolate elements of metaphor, simile, metonymy and irony in the text; discuss the ways in which these elements are used to echo/articulate the themes of the text structurally.

    2. Comment on the formal features of the text (e.g., the use of metre, sound patterning, verse form, and language). How do these features shape its meaning?

    NB: The minimum length for the essay is 1 500 words, the maximum length is 1550 words (THE WORD LIMIT INCLUDES THE MAIN TEXT OF THE ESSAY AND FOOTNOTES; it excludes the bibliography). Essays must include full footnotes and bibliographical references for all works cited or paraphrased (in accordance with the Notes and Bibliography Chicago Style – please consult the Department Essay Guidelines). Emphasis will be placed on depth and sophistication of argument, and upon the component of original research. Students are advised not to use Internet sources in place of adequately researching texts available in print or via the Charles University eResources Portal. Essays must be presented with attention to correct spelling and stylistics. Plagiarism will not be tolerated and will result in a fail grade.

    The deadline for the submission of essays is 23:59 8 December 2021. Essays must be typed in WORD format(or as an .odt file; NO PDFs) and uploaded on the course Moodle site. Contact me by e-mail (prior to the deadline) if you encounter difficulties uploading your paper.

    Extensions will only be granted on the basis of a consultation or written request accompanied by a doctor’s certificate. Students are advised that they may, at the lecturer’s discretion, be given the option of re-submission where essays have failed to achieve a satisfactory standard of argumentation. However, any rewrites must be submitted (by email or on the course site) by 17 January 2022.

    FINAL TEST
    (Only for single-subject students; see below for details.)

    ASSESSMENT

    Double-subject Students
    WS (zápočet): Attendance (max. 2 unexplained absences) and active participation in class, mid-term essay: interpretation of poetry (1 500 words).
    SS (zápočet): Attendance (max. 2 unexplained absences) and active participation in class, mid-term essay: narrative analysis (1 500 words).
    Criteria of Assessment: All assignments will be awarded a letter grade. Credit (zápočet) for each semester will be given on the basis of receiving a pass grade (i.e., A to C-) for both essay and participation.

    Single-subject Students:
    WS (zápočet): Attendance (max. 2 unexplained absences) and active participation in class, mid-term essay: interpretation of poetry (1 500 words), final test on poetics and genre definitions.
    SS (zápočet, zkouška): Attendance (max. 2 unexplained absences) and active participation in class, mid-term essay: narrative analysis (1 500 words), final test on narrative strategies and approaches to text (literary theories).
    Criteria of Assessment: All assignments will be awarded a letter grade. Credit (zápočet) for each semester will be given on the basis of receiving a pass grade (i.e., A to C-) for essay, test and participation each. The final exam grade (after the summer semester) will be calculated from the results in the individual assignments.

    Composition of Final Exam Grade for Single Subject Students

    Participation winter semester

    10%

    Participation summer semester

    10%

    Essay winter semester

    25%

    Essay summer semester

    25%

    Test winter semester

    15%

    Test summer semester

    15%

     

    Value of Individual Letter Grades Awarded for Assignments

     

    10%

    15%

    25%

    A

    10

    15

    25

    A-

    9

    13.5

    22.5

    B+

    8.7

    13

    21.75

    B

    8.5

    12.75

    21.25

    B-

    8

    12

    20

    C+

    7.7

    11.5

    19.25

    C

    7.5

    11.25

    18.75

    C-

    7

    10.5

    17.5

     

    Conversion of Grades to a Final FFUK Exam Grade

    FFUK Grade

    Letter Grade

    Percent (%)

    Generally Accepted Meaning

    1

          A

    96-100

    Outstanding work

          A-

    90-95

    2

          B+

    87-89

    Good work, distinctly above average

          B

    83-86

          B-

    80-82

    3

          C+

    77-79

    Acceptable work

          C

    73-76

          C-

    70-72

    F

          F

    0-69

    Work that does not meet minimum standards for passing the course

     

    Example:
    A student’s performance has been graded as follows:
    Participation winter semester                      A-      = 9
    Participation summer semester                   B       = 8.5
    Essay winter semester                                A-      = 22.5
    Essay summer semester                             C       = 18.75
    Test winter semester                                   C      = 11.25
    Test summer semester                                B      = 12.75
    The final exam grade is                            2 (B-) = 82.75%